Business & Development Actors Partnering to Reach the SDGs Together – Insights from Global Partnership Bangladesh Workshop

Realising the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 requires resources from all actors – public and private, domestic and international. A Technical Workshop on Private Sector Engagement (PSE) explored how the government, businesses, civil society and the development community can work together in practical ways to create “shared value” for business profit and development impact.

Embracing this shift-change in development co-operation, participants agreed on how different partners can align their interests and foster trust to use development co-operation in innovative ways to work with the private sector and scale up much-needed solutions to Bangladesh’s development challenges.

The workshop was held as a first in a series of country-level consultations in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 4-5 February 2018, hosted by the Ministry of Finance, together with the ICC Bangladesh, with support of the Government of Germany and under the aegis of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation (GPEDC).

A case study based on a mapping of over 240 private sector engagement projects in Bangladesh with development co-operation support – focused on finance, agriculture, manufacturing and energy – served as background for the discussions. Policy recommendations on effective private sector engagement focused on engaging the business and development community in more inclusive, government-led policy dialogue, and more structured knowledge sharing and learning to align interests, strengthen trust and build capacity around a range of specific national priorities. Emphasis was placed on generating greater poverty impact of PSE through development co-operation, with a focus on supporting micro-, small- and medium-enterprises, greater transparency and accountability as well as a focus on data, results and impact, social dialogue, climate change, and gender equality.

The Global Partnership 2017-2018 Work Programme aims to guide the development community on how to adapt policies and approaches to engage the business sector on the SDGs. It works towards mutually agreed guidelines for effective private sector engagement through development co-operation.

The event was attended by around 60 representatives from the Government of Bangladesh, many development partners, small and medium enterprises, large domestic and transnational firms, business associations, civil society organizations, trade unions, parliamentarians, foundations, and research and development institutes. It encouraged greater peer learning on effective PSE through development co-operation with participating neighbouring countries India, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

Similar case study reports are being carried out in Egypt, El Salvador and Uganda in 2018 to generate mutually agreed global guidelines for effective private sector engagement through development co-operation.

For more information on the Technical Workshop, please click here.

To read more about the GPEDC’s Private Sector work please see here.

Annual Call for Reporting from Global Partnership Initiatives

On 23 January, the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation launched its annual call for reporting to all Global Partnership Initiatives (GPIs), which will be open through 23 February.

This annual exercise collects feedback from GPIs on their progress, activities and lessons learned and helps to identify results from country and regional-level efforts to implement the Busan Principles. It also presents an opportunity for GPIs to communicate their work to the wider Global Partnership audience and to explore opportunities for further partnership between themselves, the Global Partnership and other GPIs.

GPIs are voluntary initiatives led by different types of development actors, such as national governments, civil society organisations, trade unions, the private sector and others. They advance implementation of the development effectiveness principles and commitments agreed through the Busan Partnership Agreement (2011), the Mexico High Level Meeting Communiqué (2014) and the Nairobi Outcome Document (2016).

GPIs directly contribute to the Global Partnership’s vision by implementing commitments at the country and regional levels, and generating evidence, policy-relevant lessons and innovative solutions that can feed mutual accountability and learning into the Global Partnership.

There are currently 29 active GPIs supported by 58 organisations, with work spanning nine key areas, including promoting country ownership, a focus on results, inclusive partnerships and transparency and accountability, multi-dimensional measurements of poverty, conflict and fragility, resource mobilisation and climate finance.

GPI Focal Points are asked to submit inputs by 23 February to participate in the annual reporting. Questions may be addressed to the Joint Support Team at

The results of the annual reporting will be showcased on the Global Partnership website, at Steering Committee meetings and other Global Partnership events and will directly contribute to the Global Partnership’s efforts to share knowledge around effective development co-operation.

How to become a GPI?

To launch a new initiative, please follow this guidance and submit an application for review against the application criteria.

To update information related to an existing GPI, please contact the Joint Support Team at

Paving the way for the SDGs – Highlights from the Busan Global Partnership Forum

The Fourth Busan Global Partnership Forum was convened by the Republic of Korea on 21-22 November 2017, on the eve of the one-year anniversary of the Second High-Level Meeting (HLM2) of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation. The Forum provides a valuable vehicle for policymakers and development practitioners to review progress made since 2011 and discuss how the Global Partnership can concretely support achievement of the 2030 Agenda.

Over 130 practitioners from 35 countries were in attendance in Busan, where they discussed the Global Partnership’s renewed mandate and linkages to the 2030 Agenda. Key messages from the 2017 Busan Global Partnership Forum include:

Translating commitments into country-level action. There is a shared understanding that decisions and commitments made at the global level, including the Nairobi Outcome Document, need to translate into practical action by all stakeholders at the country level, ensuring effective use of resources in support of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Against the backdrop of the evolving development co-operation landscape, effective development co-operation remains crucial in supporting implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

Participants reiterated their commitment to the effectiveness principles, and highlighted the need to reinvigorate political momentum for effective development co-operation; strengthen operationalisation of the principles at the country level; and intensify engagement with non-traditional actors to facilitate learning and sharing of knowledge, in order to scale up the impact of development co-operation in the context of the SDGs.

Participants welcomed efforts made to strengthen the Global Partnership’s monitoring framework and improve its relevance for the SDGs follow-up and review. This will require a heightened focus on outcomes, building on complementary sources to gather qualitative and contextual information.

Global Partnership Initiatives play a key role in facilitating effective development co-operation, including at the country level. Participants urged the Global Partnership to make better use of the evidence generated by GPIs and better facilitate the sharing of this knowledge.

The private sector plays a crucial role in implementing the 2030 Agenda. Participants called for the examination of conditions under which private sector engagement can be leveraged through development co-operation to deliver shared value for both those most in need and the private sector.

Participants also stressed the need to promote high-level political support and strengthen linkages with UN institutions and processes, including providing inputs on effectiveness to the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, Financing for Development follow-up, and ensuring complementarity with the UN Development Cooperation Forum.

Going forward, the Global Partnership will intensify communication with all stakeholders and continue to explore meaningful ways to engage the variety of partners, including Southern partners and private sector, to deepen mutual learning and promote effective and complementary contributions to the 2030 Agenda.

Read the outcome report of the 2017 Busan Global Partnership Forum.