How do we tackle youth unemployment?

Youth employment - it is serious and it needs attention - we need to think about how we align education to experience and opportunity.  What about paid internships funded by governments so students get the experience they need working with the private and social profit sector?  

Comments

Asheesh Kumar Pandey a Educator and Educational Theorist Mon, June 22,2015

I thinks opportunities are there in Govt. and Non-Govt. sector but it need to be emplement.

LukeH a writer
Mon, August 25,2014


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Heewoong Kim
Mon, April 28,2014

Thank you for this interesting chain of discussions on youth unemployment. 

First off, I think it would be important not forget that there are many disperaties among 'youth' in terms of income, education, skills, etc. Hence, I would be more specific on identifying what type of youth is most in need, can be reached and how best to tackle this specfic gruop of youth unemployment (and by whom), rather than lumping youth into one single group. 

I understand that there have been many new studies on enterpreneurship showing that SMEs are not particularly good for producing sustainable and desirable jobs for youth in many country context. Also, enterpreneurship is not for everybody. Hence, on the demand side, for jobs purposes of fairly educated youth, it might be better for the governments to provide policy incentives for mid- to big-size firms to produce more jobs. As for the supply side, traditional internships, mentoring and soft skills training have proven to be helpful, but costly when well managed. Targeting the right population of youth seems to be a key issue in this part. Both youth and companies do not know what to look for. In the middle east context, a NGO, Education for Employment (http://efe.org) seems to be doing some interesting and successful (but a bit costy) interventions in these areas of targeting youth and training soft skills. UNDP Egypt also has some initiatives for educated youth to enhance soft skills for jobs. I also share a McKinsey report, which most of you might already know, related to this this group of youth and skills/education for jobs, FYI: http://www.mckinsey.com/client_service/public_sector/mckinsey_center_for_government/education_to_employment 

But, youth unemployment is also a serious problem for uneducated, vulnerable youth, who might not be able to tap into the youth programmes outlined above. Most pro-poor strategies have not in particular targeted youth to my knowledge. (Do correct me if I'm wrong.) In Egypt, UNDP has initiated a Public Works programme prioritizing youth. This provides short-term labour-intensive jobs and work experience for unskilled youth. Currently, it has been picked up by the government and is being scaled up nation-wide with support from other donors. While providing much needed jobs for youth and the poor, we do understand that it does have its limitations for being a short-term initiative for the participants. Hence, we are looking into ways of increasing the sustainable of the programme by linking the public works with micro-savings/credits or skills trainings schemes (as a Public Works Plus). I also understand that there are many flexiable/alternative education programmes trying to target this population of uneducated/unskilled youth to go back to have a decent vocational education. I heard many good anecdotes from these initiatives, but not sure of there concrete results. UNESCO in 2012 published an EFA report on Youth and Skills education FYI: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/brasilia/about-this-office/single-view/news/efa_monitoring_report_2012_youth_and_skills_putting_education_to_work_summary_in_portuguese/#.U14lK_mSwnc

These are my two cents worth on the subject. Thank you! 

Emmanuel BOR a UNDP Technical Adviser (PFM)
Tue, April 22,2014

Jobs for the youth has emerged as a priority area for the Mauritius authorities in view of high youth unemployment. Statistics available for 3rd quarter 2013 have highlighted that the unemployment rate of the youth (aged 16-24) has reached 22.2%, well above the unemployment rate of the general population (7.8%) (Statistics Mauritius, December 2013). 

Three recent initiatives promoted by the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development in Mauritius to improve youth employability may be highlighted and shared. 

First, the Government of Mauritius has established in 2013 a joint public-private initiative called the Youth Employment Programme. The main objective of the YEP is to enable unemployed youth to obtain training/placement for an initial period of one year, with the possibility of permanent employment thereafter on condition of satisfactory performance.

How does it work? Through a government contribution, the YEP offers a subsidy on the stipend paid to the youth during his/her first year of placement/training. Registered employers can either recruit directly, or use the YEP website (www.yet.mu) to select youth that satisfy their requirements. The database provides the opportunity for youth to specify their fields of interest.  The YEP’s results in 2013 have been very impressive, with 4,200 youth placed in 455 companies since this programme’s inception.

Second, the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development in Mauritius has designed an initiative which aims both at providing jobs for the youth in the public sector and attracting high-calibre graduates in the civil service. The “Service to Mauritius Programme (STM)” is an internship programme designed for fresh and young graduates with outstanding capabilities.  The period of internship ranges from a minimum period of 6 months up to a maximum of 3 years in total. Although the STM are called interns, they receive a competitive package, often above the civil service salary scale, but for a fixed-term contract. The main objectives of the programme are, inter alia, to attract the best and the brightest young minds to spend some time in public service and to provide an opportunity for these candidates to get some work experience. The programme has been successful in attracting qualified youth: as of 2013, over 300 STM interns were enlisted in ministries and departments.

 Third, faced with a serious skills mismatch issue in the youth labour market, the national authorities in Mauritius are working on a “Dual Training Programme” which will allow private companies to sponsor youth for university programmes which will integrate studies and training in companies. The Human Resource Development Council is also contributing to a better information of students on careers and jobs opportunities in each sector of the economy.

Emmanuel Bor

UNDP Mauritius

Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua a Civil Society Organisation (CSO)
Wed, April 23,2014

the 3 initiatives set in place by the Government of Mauritius to combat youth unemployability and to promote youth empowerement are all good initiative. this will go a long way to improve youth entrepreneurship and reduce corruption among the youth. we also encourage the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development in Mauritius to sensitize to youth to participate fully in this programme for result accomplishment.

Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua foundation.

 

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Wed, April 23,2014
In some regions of Spain and Greece, youth unemployment is now above 70%. The latest figures released by eurostat also indicate that long-term unemployment is currently at record levels in the EU, with nearly half of all unemployed people having been out of work for more than a year. And there is also a clear disparity between the North and the South; the average EU unemployment rate is 10.8%, but the jobless rate is half the average (5.4%) in 23 of Germany’s 39 regions and twice the average (21.6%) in 13 out of 19 regions in Spain. -------------------------------------------------------------------
Attachment(s) 1-15042014-BP-EN.PDF
Mohammed Ataur Rahman a Professor Mohammed Ataur Rahman
Sun, April 27,2014

Thank you Eugene,

I did not know that the German ladies get leave even upto three years for taking care of their children. It is really a great honor to the mums who take care of their children and of course of the family, their works in the home are recognized by the state as well as by the society. This act provides ample scope to develop the children with motherly care and these children will be more affectionate to their famitilies and will show more respect to the society. I hope this respect to the mother's work and its recognitions are needed all over the world and it will create more job opportunities for the youths. Do you think a further study on human behavior is needed?

Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua a Civil Society Organisation (CSO)
Mon, April 28,2014

It is with great shock to read the German Government kind attitude to wards women, this shows that the Government of Germany value women and thier contribution to societal and economic development. we wish other country could emulate this, most especially in the developing countries.

while we appreciate this good gesture of the German Government, we are not however sure how this will tend to reduce unemployment in the society. Curbing unemployment in youth requires more than permitting women to stay 3years at home nurturing their up growing children.

we encourage the Government of each country to promote youth entrepeneurship and sustainability, we belive if this is put to practice, it will go a long way in reducing unemployment in youth.

 

Bashir Yunus
Programme Coordinator
Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua Foundation
info@asyarf.org
www.asyarf.org.

 

Mohammed Ataur Rahman a Professor Mohammed Ataur Rahman
Sun, April 27,2014

Thank you Eugene,

I did not know that the German ladies get leave even upto three years for taking care of their children. It is really a great honor to the mums who take care of their children and of course of the family, their works in the home are recognized by the state as well as by the society. This act provides ample scope to develop the children with motherly care and these children will be more affectionate to their famitilies and will show more respect to the society. I hope this respect to the mother's work and its recognitions are needed all over the world and it will create more job opportunities for the youths. Do you think a further study on human behavior is needed?

Lal Manavado a An analyst
Thu, April 24,2014

Unemployment.

 

Unemployment rates are rising everywhere, and the figures are a matter of grave concern. I can envisage only one way to counter this immense threat to social stability both in Europe and elsewhere.

 

First, it is imperative to recall that the financial resources now available to reward the  newly employed among the currently unemployed, are very limited. This is simply because 'money' supply is not only limited, but its distribution is very unfair.

 

Great deal of the available capital in industrialsed countries seems to be invested in 'labour saving' devices, research and development in that area, and to paying the few employed in that sector.

 

Assuming that the youth are interested in acquiring the know-how and skills required for their employment, and are willing and able to do so, even then their 'education' can but lead them into a blind alley, because the number of vacancies in the fashionable sectors are limited.

 

Consider the number of students who enroll in  courses for estate agents, economists, lawyers, psycologists, user support for 'microsoft products', stock brokers, etc.

 

It is strange that the 'education' on offer today is primarily concerned with producing jobbers in non-creative areas noted above,  or areas concerned with 'labour saving mechanisms'.

 

The sequestration of the capital in few hands and the emphasis current irrational 'education' places on imparting to one non-creative abilities,  will inevitably lead to increasing unemployment anywhere, for  one has to create before one can talk about  fair distribution of resources.

 

The matter is made even more complex owing to indifference, inability of one to acquire  the qualifications needed to get work owing to a wide variety of reasons. They may include poverty, ill-health, insecurity in one's ambience, lack of facilities,  and not uncommonly, having potential abilities which are not 'marketable' under the modern 'economic atmosphere'. It would be fair to say that had he be born in our time, Chekov would have remained an obscure country doctor if he did not know how to get hold of a pushy 'literary agent' and a 'pr man'.

 

So, to resolve the issue, we need to desequester the capital, viz., economic devolution in order to make funds available to pay the newly employed, and a radically new way of thinking, i. e., labour saving does not save people, it enables the rich to get richer.

 

At the same time, it is crucial that we inculcate into the youth the notion that money  does stink if it is gained in a way that drives others into abject poverty and ruins our environment, and having more money  than necessary to meet one's justifiable needs, for it is as unseemly and unhealthy as gorging food ad libitum.

 

And let us try to think of creating creative jobs.  Moreover, their are many 'service jobs' that have disappeared owing to irrational automation. Why not re-introduce them?

 

A minimum income may be of some short-term value, but, I think it is impossible to claim that such a measure takes into account the currently fashionable notions of human dignity, for it reduces the unemployed into mendicants supported by governments. Not a very appealing prospect to a youth who has been the victim of 'education' geared to produce jobbers, most of whom are not materially productive though reproductive.

 

Lal Manavado. 

 

 

 

 

Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua
Thu, April 24,2014
Youths unemployment could be tacked by skill acquisition. " An idle hand is a devil's workshop "...

Thank you.


Dr. Asabe.
Lal Manavado a An analyst
Thu, April 24,2014

Unemployment.

 

Unemployment rates are rising everywhere, and the figures are a matter of grave concern. I can envisage only one way to counter this immense threat to social stability both in Europe and elsewhere.

 

First, it is imperative to recall that the financial resources now available to reward the  newly employed among the currently unemployed, are very limited. This is simply because 'money' supply is not only limited, but its distribution is very unfair.

 

Great deal of the available capital in industrialsed countries seems to be invested in 'labour saving' devices, research and development in that area, and to paying the few employed in that sector.

 

Assuming that the youth are interested in acquiring the know-how and skills required for their employment, and are willing and able to do so, even then their 'education' can but lead them into a blind alley, because the number of vacancies in the fashionable sectors are limited.

 

Consider the number of students who enroll in  courses for estate agents, economists, lawyers, psycologists, user support for 'microsoft products', stock brokers, etc.

 

It is strange that the 'education' on offer today is primarily concerned with producing jobbers in non-creative areas noted above,  or areas concerned with 'labour saving mechanisms'.

 

The sequestration of the capital in few hands and the emphasis current irrational 'education' places on imparting to one non-creative abilities,  will inevitably lead to increasing unemployment anywhere, for  one has to create before one can talk about  fair distribution of resources.

 

The matter is made even more complex owing to indifference, inability of one to acquire  the qualifications needed to get work owing to a wide variety of reasons. They may include poverty, ill-health, insecurity in one's ambience, lack of facilities,  and not uncommonly, having potential abilities which are not 'marketable' under the modern 'economic atmosphere'. It would be fair to say that had he be born in our time, Chekov would have remained an obscure country doctor if he did not know how to get hold of a pushy 'literary agent' and a 'pr man'.

 

So, to resolve the issue, we need to desequester the capital, viz., economic devolution in order to make funds available to pay the newly employed, and a radically new way of thinking, i. e., labour saving does not save people, it enables the rich to get richer.

 

At the same time, it is crucial that we inculcate into the youth the notion that money  does stink if it is gained in a way that drives others into abject poverty and ruins our environment, and having more money  than necessary to meet one's justifiable needs, for it is as unseemly and unhealthy as gorging food ad libitum.

 

And let us try to think of creating creative jobs.  Moreover, their are many 'service jobs' that have disappeared owing to irrational automation. Why not re-introduce them?

 

A minimum income may be of some short-term value, but, I think it is impossible to claim that such a measure takes into account the currently fashionable notions of human dignity, for it reduces the unemployed into mendicants supported by governments. Not a very appealing prospect to a youth who has been the victim of 'education' geared to produce jobbers, most of whom are not materially productive though reproductive.

 

Lal Manavado. 

 

 

 

 

Lal Manavado a An analyst
Thu, April 24,2014

Unemployment.

 

Unemployment rates are rising everywhere, and the figures are a matter of grave concern. I can envisage only one way to counter this immense threat to social stability both in Europe and elsewhere.

 

First, it is imperative to recall that the financial resources now available to reward the  newly employed among the currently unemployed, are very limited. This is simply because 'money' supply is not only limited, but its distribution is very unfair.

 

Great deal of the available capital in industrialsed countries seems to be invested in 'labour saving' devices, research and development in that area, and to paying the few employed in that sector.

 

Assuming that the youth are interested in acquiring the know-how and skills required for their employment, and are willing and able to do so, even then their 'education' can but lead them into a blind alley, because the number of vacancies in the fashionable sectors are limited.

 

Consider the number of students who enroll in  courses for estate agents, economists, lawyers, psycologists, user support for 'microsoft products', stock brokers, etc.

 

It is strange that the 'education' on offer today is primarily concerned with producing jobbers in non-creative areas noted above,  or areas concerned with 'labour saving mechanisms'.

 

The sequestration of the capital in few hands and the emphasis current irrational 'education' places on imparting to one non-creative abilities,  will inevitably lead to increasing unemployment anywhere, for  one has to create before one can talk about  fair distribution of resources.

 

The matter is made even more complex owing to indifference, inability of one to acquire  the qualifications needed to get work owing to a wide variety of reasons. They may include poverty, ill-health, insecurity in one's ambience, lack of facilities,  and not uncommonly, having potential abilities which are not 'marketable' under the modern 'economic atmosphere'. It would be fair to say that had he be born in our time, Chekov would have remained an obscure country doctor if he did not know how to get hold of a pushy 'literary agent' and a 'pr man'.

 

So, to resolve the issue, we need to desequester the capital, viz., economic devolution in order to make funds available to pay the newly employed, and a radically new way of thinking, i. e., labour saving does not save people, it enables the rich to get richer.

 

At the same time, it is crucial that we inculcate into the youth the notion that money  does stink if it is gained in a way that drives others into abject poverty and ruins our environment, and having more money  than necessary to meet one's justifiable needs, for it is as unseemly and unhealthy as gorging food ad libitum.

 

And let us try to think of creating creative jobs.  Moreover, their are many 'service jobs' that have disappeared owing to irrational automation. Why not re-introduce them?

 

A minimum income may be of some short-term value, but, I think it is impossible to claim that such a measure takes into account the currently fashionable notions of human dignity, for it reduces the unemployed into mendicants supported by governments. Not a very appealing prospect to a youth who has been the victim of 'education' geared to produce jobbers, most of whom are not materially productive though reproductive.

 

Lal Manavado. 

 

 

 

 

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Thu, April 24,2014
It's very interesting, thank you at all. Policymakers are petrified by increasing sentiments against migration across Europe. The Swiss population has voted against the free movement of workers; the Cameron government in the UK has requested a renegotiation of the EU’s treaties asking explicitly for restrictions on labour mobility within the Union – a pillar of the Common Market since the Rome Treaty. In Germany, a debate on so-called ‘poverty immigration’ from Bulgaria and Romania has fanned fears that immigrants abuse the welfare state. Populist movements will make the election for the European Parliament a sort of referendum on migration and the free mobility of workers within the EU. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tito Boeri
Lal Manavado
Mon, April 28,2014
Free movement of labour within EU.
 
Once again, these reactions are inevitable, because the notion that it would not be undesirable to  allow free movement of labour within the EU,  is based on an obvious reductive fallacy.
 
If job vacancies in country A cannot be filled owing to a quantitative shortage of workers, the above free movement may be useful, provided that it does not entail cultural irritation in the host country. The first condition does not obtain, and the second has been totally ignored by the so-called policy makers.
 
What it boils down to is, that free movement of labour enables the employers to hire cheap labour at the expense of the local unemployed. Naturally, this does not endear the migrant workers to the host population, and the matter gets worse, when it involves too great a cultural diversity.
 
One would have thought these points are obvious, but as always, the decision-makers are impervious to reason.
 
Lal Manavado.


From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]
Sent: Friday, April 25, 2014 4:46 AM
To: Lal Manavado
Subject: [World We Want 2015] Eugene TISHCHENKO commented on the Discussion "How do we tackle youth unemployment?"

Hilary Best a Executive Assistant
Mon, April 21,2014

I’d like to share the work that CivicAction is doing in this area in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton region of Ontario, Canada as an example of how government, private sector, and civil society can come together to tackle an intractable problem such as youth unemployment.

In the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, we’re looking at a lost generation.  There are 83,000 youth between 15-24 in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area who are stuck in limbo (representing 10% of the youth population).  They’re currently not in education, employment or training. Certain subgroups within this population face additional barriers to employment due to their demographics, socio-economic situation, or a lack of mentors. Our focus is on youth who face barriers to employment but who can be job ready - with moderate training, mentorship, and experience.

The cost of inaction on this issue is enormous. Unemployed or underemployed youth lose financially, but society loses as well. A US study found that youth facing barriers to work have the lifetime impact of $1 million per youth. At the same time, employers are facing a skills challenge.  2 out of 3  of employers find it difficult to find employees with the right soft skills. Over the past year, the Greater Toronto CivicAction Alliance has worked with the Province of Ontario to identify ways to increase private sector involvement in opening up economic opportunities for youth facing barriers, using a regional approach. Working with the region’s employers we are developing a implementable action plan that clearly outlines what employers can do to meet their business objectives and create more opportunities for youth facing barriers to employment.  We are building awareness and support among employers to adopt best practices.

Our work is driven by a cohesive multi-stakeholder approach. We have brought together a wide spectrum of stakeholders – representatives from business, union, academia, social agencies and youth– to set common goals and work together to achieve them. The recommendations coming out of our work will be practical and realistic. Recognizing the fiscal and operational capacity challenges governments face today, our plan will be cost-effective and results oriented. We are also committed to not reinventing the wheel. We will focus on best practices and proven solutions to address core challenges related to long term youth unemployment. We will leverage existing infrastructure and work with organizations poised to implement the next steps.

 Based on feedback from our Taskforce, Working Group and regional roundtables, we propose to focus on four initial actions to tackle this problem in our region:

  1. Regional mentorship initiative: Connecting Youth with Role Models
  2. Employer-designed training & internships: Closing the Skills Gap
  3. Engaging Small and medium-sized enterprises: Bringing Job Opportunities into the Open
  4. Transparency of job market: Connecting the Dots between Supply & Demand

For employers, these actions will result in improved workforce planning, cost efficient recruiting, increase diversity, flexibility, innovation, and tech-savviness of their workforce, and a positive brand image. For youth, these actions will result in positive alternatives leading to youth success, knowledge of occupational skills & workplace settings (transferrable skills), enhanced work history & networking possibilities, increased confidence & sense of responsibility, and increased income & financial independence.

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Wed, April 23,2014
Earlier this month, the European Economic and Social Committee – a consultative body of the EU composed of employers’ organisations, trade unions and civil society - hosted a conference discussing the possibility of introducing a UBI at the EU level. The conference was arranged by the organisers of a recent European Citizens’ Initiative calling for just such a European Basic Income. Although the Citizens’ Initiative failed to gather the required 1 million signatures, it did receive the backing of 285,000 Europeans and the organisers now hope to petition the European Parliament. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://basicincome2013.eu/
Tony Matta a Retired
Sat, April 19,2014

Unemployment, youth or otherwise is just an oversupply problem.  Too many people, not enough jobs.

Just like every other problem.  Too many people bot enough food.  Too many people not enough, hospitals.  Too many people not enough schools.

200 million women world wide desire but don't have access to modern contraception.  Half of all pregnancies are unintended.  The simplest solution to youth unemployment is to have fewer youth.  

Humans have the capacity to have many more children than the planet can accomodate.  We have the technology to make sure that people only have the children they want when they want them.  Family planning is the only sustainable solution..

Mohammed Ataur Rahman a Professor Mohammed Ataur Rahman
Mon, April 28,2014

Dear Tonny,

Family Planning is big word. Could you please recommend a few sustainable methods/solutions? In many countries ladies are becoming hopelss taking contraceptic pills and having uterine tumours 

Tony Matta a Retired
Tue, April 29,2014

I am not an expert in family planing but there are many alternatives.  Pretty much every fertile woman in the world that can afford it is using or has used one type of contraception or an other.  Uterine tumours are not a big cause of women dying when compared with deaths from child birth complications and bad abortion attempts. 

The world population is only growing because of unwanted pregnancies.  No problem can remain solved for very long if population keeps on growing. The pourest countries are just suffering the fate that all countries will when their populations exceed their resource availability.  Every other problem becomes easier when this problem is solved. 

Lal Manavado
Tue, April 29,2014
I am happy to hear another voice supporting this view.
 
In many of my previous remarks, I pointed out that the possibility of human survival on earth depends on the balance between the living and the mineral resources essential for their existence. Eg. water, oxygen, etc.
 
Now this balance depends on the balance between  the types of living and their number, i. e. biodiversity and population.
 
So, over-population of any species including man is harmful to life in general, and of course to other men.
 
Before the advances in medicine many ch8ildren  died before they were 5 years of age.
 
But, now even in poor countries, child survival rates are somewhat better than what they used to be.
 
It is clear that we have continued to  think of reproduction as the people of the stone age did, viz., accepted it as a natural phenomenon like rain or drought, about which we can do nothing.
 
Otherwise, it is difficult to understand why we have failed to see human population growth as the greatest threat to man and beast alike.
 
Lal Manavado.
 
 


From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]
Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2014 9:17 AM
To: Lal Manavado
Subject: [World We Want 2015] Interested person commented on the Discussion "How do we tackle youth unemployment?"

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Wed, April 23,2014
Here is what the broad picture looks like: most German mums do not work in the first year after their child was born. In the UK, most mums are back at work six to nine months after giving birth. One reason surely is that maternity leave and pay conditions are more generous in Germany. Moreover, while in the UK positions are usually kept open for one year, German mums have the right to return to their previous jobs up to three years after giving birth. Most German mums decide to stay at home for that long. Only one-third of mothers with kids under three go to work in Germany, the vast majority of them part-time. Fewer than one in ten works full-time. Correspondingly, German babies and young toddlers are half as likely to go to nurseries or child-minders than British ones. -----------------------------------------------------------------
Attachment(s) 1-15042014-BP-EN.PDF
Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua a Civil Society Organisation (CSO)
Tue, April 22,2014

unemployment within the youth is a killer disease, that is why we are clamouring for youth and women empowerment, if a woman is empowered she can empower the whole nation and she will also know that; it is absolutely wrong to bring to the world a child she can not cater for. we also encorage the youth to go into skills acquisation and not to divert all thier attention searching for a white collar job for instance in sub sahara Africa (Nigeria) thousands of youths run into governmental jobs and position because its an avenue to make fast money, and they do not want to be resourceful.

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Wed, April 23,2014
The first claim is that what looks like stagnation isn’t, because real gains have been mislabelled as mere inflation. The everyday technology of today was the stuff of science fiction in the 1970s when this apparent stagnation began. Perhaps inflation measures haven’t kept up. There is truth in this argument, although we will never know how much truth unless somebody figures out how many Sinclair ZX81s an iPad is worth. But we should be cautious. In the US, 40 per cent of the consumer price index (CPI) tracks the cost of housing and related costs such as domestic heating; another 30 per cent tracks the cost of food and drink. If two-thirds of my income goes on basics such as food and shelter, and my income is barely keeping pace with the price of such basics, there is a limit to how ecstatic I am likely to feel about the fact that iPhones exist. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ http://timharford.com/2014/04/have-living-standards-really-stopped-rising/
Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua
Thu, April 24,2014
Sub-Sahara Africa is the worst, with almost every Youth on the street looking for white collar job where they can make fast money.

Dr. Asabe.
Lal Manavado
Mon, April 28,2014
Indeed, this is the biggest problem.
 
Politicians and the so-called 'free media' has warped the minds of the young so that they belieeve that the purpose of having money is to buy the kitch consumer electronics and feed on the worst junk in the world. This is expensive, and so, they want to do as little as possible but want as much money as possible.
 
As long as this awful 'expectation' is their motivating value,  it is difficult to see how  one could solve the unemployment problem. I think it is essential that  those who are willing and able to think in every society should actively begin a campaign of ethical re-education, so that the youth may understand that consumerism leads to more misery and miserable lives.
 
 
Lal Manavado.
 


From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]
Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 8:31 PM
To: Lal Manavado
Subject: [World We Want 2015] Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua commented on the Discussion "How do we tackle youth unemployment?"

Francis MBILIMA
Tue, April 15,2014

Causal factors to youth unemployment are well understood and only require regular updates. They are rooted in cyclic interplay of globalization, technological advancements, labour migration, educational systems not aligned to labour markets and individual ingenuity. These forces lend themselves at structural (macro, policy), meso (circumstantial, contextual e.g. rural, urban, peri-urban) and micro (individual endorwements, skill combination and levels, social networks etc).

Answers to youth unemployment also abound from countries that have low rates such as NORDIC and some Middle East countries. Local solutions can be enriched by such experiences and other bloggers have pointed to transformation of education systems to embrace practical orientation through paid apprenticeship, streamlined career guidance services, internships and facilitating talents such as sports, art & entertainment development and entreprenuership.

At macro-level, very few LDCs have elaborate databases on available skills within the country matches to needs of evolving industries. In LDCs, dependance on export of raw materials is responsible for the employment lag and reliance on external labour for labour-intensive projects in road contruction, energy, tourism and mining with no safeguards for skills transfer. Dialogue on retirement age for public service is another immotive subject as well as average minimum wage and by sector.

Certainly, there is need for a mix of interventions at all levels, documentation of critical lessons and s-s, triangular cooperation as well as innovation based on local context and labour market content. The other greatest possibility is small meduim enterprises. In Zambia, UNDP and ILO etc are supporting efforts aimed at targeted value addition sectors to boost productivity, technological adaptation and linkages to boost employability of SMEs.

From my lessons from recent visit to Israel - the Start-Up Nation - incredible success have been scored through dedicated support using incubation centres that not only provide space for innovative ideas to blossom but also guaranteed financing mainly from private sector but with Government committing an appreciable amount on business terms(shareholding). Israel has best lessons for the World in that regard of nurturing youthful, innovative self employment with admirable success in areas of agriculture and medical devices and equipment. Henceforth, it has consistently been the best performing nation in start-ups and innovation for social development.Click here to view.

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Thu, April 17,2014
Emotional labor that requires workers to suppress their truly felt emotions and create a fake emotional display has negative consequences for workers including psychological distress and lowered job satisfaction. This type of emotional labor, called surface acting, is often necessary in public service work. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Melissa M. Sloan
Philip Harris
Mon, April 07,2014

There should be discussions on how to ensure that businesses and other job providers can have more favourable entry-level jobs. Far too often, for young people who have just finished education, only internships (most of them unpaid) are available (and in limited quantities) because job providers are unwilling to hire people without experience (the conundrum of “you need a job in order to get experience, but no one will hire you because of your lack of experience”). While education providers have the responsibility of ensuring that education is helpful and suited for future employment, job providers also have the responsibility of providing appropriate employment for youth, especially those with little or no experience.

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Fri, April 11,2014
"We cannot allow a generation to be lost," Merkel said last July during a crisis summit with the leaders of numerous European Union member states held in Berlin to address the problem of rampant unemployment among young adults in large parts of Europe. At the time, the German chancellor and other EU leaders pledged €8 billion ($11 billion) to address the problem. And Germany already had a program ready to help. So Ribeiro, who asked that his real name not be published in order to protect his identity, applied for assistance at the end of 2013 through the program, which carries the bureaucratic moniker MobiPro-EU. The program is intended to help young unemployed people, particularly those from Southern Europe, start careers in Germany. At the same time, it aims to help German companies fill vacant job positions in a country where firms in many sectors are having trouble recruiting enough skilled workers. ------------------------- http://www.spiegel.de/international/business/berlin-hits-funding-wall-with-program-to-lure-eu-workers-a-963621.html

I fully agree that those who employ do not do their share of sacrifice, will soon have a shortage of labor as I have in several areas considered less noble as construction in developing countries.

This comment has been deleted.
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Mon, April 14,2014
Companies like the Gap and Costco, which have increased entry-level wages, do so because they expect those voluntary increases to be profitable in the long run. Such actions are consistent with free market principles, unlike a minimum wage law that forces employers to pay more than the prevailing market wage and prevents workers from contracting for less than the legal minimum in order to retain or secure a job. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.cato.org/blog/minimum-wage-solidarity-misplaced?utm_content=buffer19bbe&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
Asabe Shehu Yar'Adua a Civil Society Organisation (CSO)
Mon, March 31,2014

Youth unemployment cannot be tackled by Government alone. Able Bodies can join hands with the government  by providing job opportunities, Youth empowerment (skill acquisition for self-employment), so that they can be able to take care of themselves and their families.

An idle hand is the devil's workshop...

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Tue, April 01,2014
But some particular measures is needed at all. Eurasian Economic Club of Scientistst have proposed some of that measures.
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Mon, March 31,2014
What about generation of boomerang in USA?! Young people who stay with their parents?!

A questão do emprego entre os jovens é preocupante sim! Contudo estamos querendo acertar algo que já começou muito errado. Nos países sub-desenvolvidos há um tipo de problema: a sobrevivência, e nos países "desenvolvidos" outro problema: achar que nada lhes atingiria.

Assim os jovens dos dois extremos encontram-se incapazes de promover uma reação própria e , sem ajuda, entram numa espiral descendente de pessimismo e revolta.

É urgente que se faça um pacto global pelo homem, buscando resgatá-lo de todas as formas de degradação, a começar com o direito a sobreviver dignamente, receber uma formação escolar que possibilite a abertura de horizontes em tempos de crise e que ninguém se estagne no assistencialismo governamental.

Há momentos que geração de trabalho e renda se sobrepõe à necessidade vaidosa, dos que querem se reeleger, de mostrar falsos números de emprego formal.

Eu não vejo esperança no que diz respeito à ecologia.

Há uma hipocrisia generalizada por parte dos países desenvolvidos que, tendo praticamente esgotado seus recursos naturais, usam esta bandeira apenas para barrar os emergentes que, por sua vez aspiram chegar ao "grupo de elite" a qualquer custo.

Preocupa-me muito a destinação de recursos para recuperação de biomas para salvar a diversidade de flora e fauna, mas não percebo o mesmo empenho para salvar pessoas em situação de risco. Etnias inteiras desapareceram, culturas sumiram e pouco ou nada se faz para preservar o ser humano.

Um marido agride e ameaça sua esposa de forma ostensiva, que denuncia e é mandada de volta ao convívio com o agressor; mas se alguém agride ou ameaça o meio ambiente é alvo de multas e até cadeia sem direito a fiança.

Para que tanta preocupação em deixar um planeta melhor para as futuras gerações se não começarmos a ensinar a nova geração a amar seu semelhante respeitando as diferenças e conservar o legado que receberá.

O grande Rei Salomão, de quem são lembradas, com ganância, as minas de ouro, foi o mais sábio de sua época e escreveu 500 anos antes de Sócrates: Provérbios 22:28 ¶ “Não removas os limites antigos que fizeram teus pais.”

O que vemos e sentimos na pele hoje é fruto da total ausência de limites em todas as esferas; a liberdade tornou-se libertinagem da família à igreja, da sociedade civil ao governo.

O dinheiro gasto em tantas conferências disto ou daquilo, deveria ser utilizado em ações práticas de conservação da vida, principalmente de pessoas.

As disputas veladas que cercam tais conferências devem ser deixadas de lado e o interesse global voltar-se para o homem a fim de primeiro salvá-lo das mazelas de uma sociedade consumista que se autoconsome; depois de salvá-lo poderíamos então educá-lo, ensinando-o a transmitir às próximas gerações o que realmente importa.

Basta de hipocrisia e disputas! Que haja união em prol da vida; vida com mais qualidade e menos quantidade.

Afinal como disse alguém: "Rico não é o que tem tudo, mas o que não precisa de nada"


Ideval G. Pereira Jr
Mestre em Ciências da Religião

Chris Williams
Fri, March 28,2014

Há fortes vozes sobre um tema desemprego particular; CGET, IUBAT (17 March 9:47am), Alterar as Perspectivas (3 March, 11:34am) e, a partir de Discussão 1, Gabriela (9 Feb, 3am) com um plano de 4 (+1) ponto.

There are strong voices on a particular unemployment topic; CGET, IUBAT (17 March 9:47am), Changing the Perspectives (3 March, 11:34am) and, from Discussion 1, Gabriela (9 Feb, 3am) with a 4 (+1) point plan.

A sociedade civil desafia regularmente neoliberais ortodoxias. Apesar de o desemprego ser um fato da vida para muitos, uma vez que existem estatísticas que agregam milhões de pessoas. O erro que se segue é que muitas suposições são feitas sobre os desempregados, ea taxa de desemprego em geral.

Neste espaço "juventude" que fala diretamente para os líderes do G20, é hora de desvendar estatísticas, desafiar os pressupostos, e redefinir o desemprego em linha com a nossa agenda inclusiva. Pessoas sem tempo integral, permanente emprego, pago continuam a ser uma parte vital das economias do G20. Como suas contribuições ser melhor reconhecido?

Tratá-los como cidadãos de segunda taxa até eles se movem em status 'empregados' parece muito discriminatória e injusta. Com a população mundial sempre crescente, e tecnologia substituindo cada vez mais os postos de trabalho, há uma melhor continuidade econômica, que inclui empregados + desempregados?

Civil society regularly challenges neo- liberal orthodoxies.  Despite unemployment being a fact of life for many, as there are statistics that aggregate millions of people. The mistake that follows is that too many assumptions are made about the unemployed, and unemployment in general.

In this 'youth' space that speaks directly to G20 Leaders, it is time to unravel statistics, challenge the assumptions, and redefine unemployment in line with our inclusive agenda.  People without full time, permanent, paid employment remain a vital part of G20 economies.  How can their contributions be better recognised? 

Treating them as second rate citizens until they move into 'employed' status seems very discriminatory and unfair.  With the world's population forever growing, and technology replacing more and more jobs, is there a better economic continuum that includes employed + unemployed people?

Chris Williams
Wed, March 26,2014

Global youth are on the move to tackle youth unemployment and other pressing issues.  More adept at modern technologies than their forebears, a global space is created today (tomorrow if you live across the International Date Line), centred simultaneously in Quebec, Tunisia and Togo.  Preliminary details are here,

  • Can youth change the world?
  • What are the commonalities between Northern and Southern youth struggles?
  • Do Social Forums allow us to strengthen our solidarity networks?

(27th, 16:45  UTC : GMT)
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Sun, March 30,2014
I suppose, there strongly needed some kind of academic exchanges.
Chris Williams
Tue, March 25,2014

What is the EU delay in funding and implementing the Youth Guarantee schemes, that were announced in 2013 to mitigate the effects of high levels of youth joblessness across the EU?

In its latest report here,

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/---publ/documents/publication/wcms_233953.pdf

the International Labour Organisation says that funds have not yet been released (p78).  If this 'guarantee' is contingent on results of EU elections, European unemployed youth have a right to feel further aggrieved that they are being treated as a political football. 

C20 could usefully monitor these Guarantee funds as they are released, and report to the G20 Leaders on the suitability of such a delayed Implementation Timetable, once these funds are actively employed in 'guaranteeing' Europe's youth a better future than the bleakness they faced from the region's fiscal austerity programs.

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Tue, March 25,2014
It turns out that from 2008 to 2012, only one in 10 people who were already long-term unemployed in a given month had returned to “steady, full-time employment” by the time government surveyors checked in on them a little more than a year later. “Steady” in this case means that they were working for at least four consecutive months. And the other nine in 10 workers? They were still out of work, toiling in part-time or transitory jobs or had dropped out of the labor force altogether.
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Tue, March 25,2014
A new Brookings Institution study that tracks the fates of those unlucky workers who don’t manage to find stable new jobs in their first few weeks of unemployment suggests that this post-layoff tailspin is distressingly common. It was already known that the longer workers have been out of a job, the lower their chance of finding work in the coming month. The Brookings paper — by the former Obama administration economist Alan Krueger and his Princeton colleagues Judd Cramer and David Cho — took this analysis a step further: What about these workers’ longer-run prospects?
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Tue, March 25,2014
What about apprenticeship fund? Over the last three decades, the use of flexible forms of employment such as fixed-term and temporary agency work contracts has increased substantially throughout much of Europe. This development has been driven by government efforts to ease restrictions on temporary employment, whereas the regulation of permanent contracts has been left essentially unaltered. The reforms of temporary employment have intended to increase overall employment by lowering dismissal and adjustment costs for flexible jobs and thereby providing firms with new opportunities. Generally, two-tier labour markets can increase labour market flexibility when it seems to be politically infeasible to reduce employment protection for workers with permanent contracts. Moreover, if a considerable share of flexible jobs is ultimately transformed into regular jobs, aggregate unemployment might decline. ---------------------------------------------------- Elke Jahn, Regina T. Riphahn, Claus Schnabel
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Thu, March 13,2014
As has been writen by Jacob Funk Kirkegaard, from Peterson Institute for International Economics, at the same time, it is important to note that there are several dynamics that can affect the true impact of a severe crisis on an entire generation of young people. In countries with ample and affordable educational and training options available and which before the crisis went through a cyclical boom, one would for instance expect a high movement from the workforce back into education/retraining after the crisis hit, causing a significant decline in the size of the youth workforce. In general, a decline in the size of a country’s workforce is a bad economic development. But if large numbers of young people go from relatively low-skilled jobs into education, the long-term effects are harder to predict. Higher skills could lead to better future career paths and a school offers a chance to sit the recession out in a safe place.
Mohammed Ataur Rahman a Professor Mohammed Ataur Rahman
Mon, March 17,2014

Unemployment is a seriuos problem on many countries. But what is an unemployment? This mainly the effects from industrialization and urbanization leaving their own land of assets or forced to leave by the others pressure. Suppose in Bangladesh there about 40 million youth still they are not worried about unemplyment since they do not have many industries but have still lands with soil and they can work. So, we need to think behind the reasons for the word unemployment.  

Eugene TISHCHENKO
Wed, March 19,2014
As wrote Robert Reich, fifty years ago, when General Motors was the largest employer in America, the typical GM worker got paid $35 an hour in today’s dollars. Today, America’s largest employer is Walmart, and the typical Walmart workers earns $8.80 an hour. Does this mean the typical GM employee a half-century ago was worth four times what today’s typical Walmart employee is worth? Not at all. Yes, that GM worker helped produce cars rather than retail sales. But he wasn’t much better educated or even that much more productive. He often hadn’t graduated from high school. And he worked on a slow-moving assembly line. Today’s Walmart worker is surrounded by digital gadgets — mobile inventory controls, instant checkout devices, retail search engines — making him or her quite productive.
Eugene TISHCHENKO
Wed, March 19,2014
One common explanation is that technological change in recent decades has conferred an advantage to those adept at working with computers and information technology. Moreover, global supply chains have moved low-skilled tasks out of advanced economies. Thus, the demand for highly skilled workers in advanced economies has increased, raising their incomes relative to those less skilled.
Melanie Redford a Social Entrepreneur
Wed, March 12,2014

As we know, the rate of youth unemployment for individuals who are 15 to 24 has been on the rise in North American, European countries and many other nations.  Even more concerning, is the large number of youth who not able to find valuable work experience to begin building a successful career. Speaking as a 2013 master’s graduate from the University of Toronto with peers between the ages of 23-29, only 2 out 12 of us have found full-time employment in our area of expertise.   It’s a terrifying reality that Generation Y’s (my master’s colleges included) are turning back towards jobs that we had when we were in high school (Starbucks, Chapters, etc).

The World Development Report 2013 very clearly articulates more jobs will reduce poverty, empower women and children and increase efficacy (among other things).  If we know that improving employment promotes social and economic advancements, why are we not working as hard as we can to decrease rates of youth unemployment?

  In order to begin to really tackle the serious issue of youth unemployment many structural reforms must be made. For example, we must encourage a realistic dialogue between teachers, counselors and high school students that provides youth with the tools to make educational decisions in areas where there actually is employment opportunities. Perhaps we can create an entrepreneurial course in high school, teach more about digital skills and have more support services for student’s considering/have dropped out of school (among many other strategies and training programs that can be put in place for high school students).   We should have greater awareness-raising projects that make youth aware of where there are job opportunities prior to leaving secondary education.  Paid internships, as Farah outlined, is another initiative that will provide youth with valuable work experience in areas that align with their education and futures (while still being able to buy groceries and pay rent)!

  There is not one singular answer to how to tackle youth unemployment.  The reality is we need to implement a multi-faceted plan for structural reforms that outlines strategies, training programs and encourages realistic dialogues about the current job market.  We must start at the root of the problem and implement programs that talk about career paths as early as elementary school.  We must continually monitor, evaluate and modify plans.  Most importantly, we must give youth the knowledge and tools to make their own (smart, realistic and tangible) decisions that will support a career within this precarious job market. 

Type forum
Date Created Thu, February 27,2014
Created By Farah Mohamed
Original Space Inclusive Growth and Employment
Cross posted in Poverty Reduction and MDG Achievement
Youth Employment Regional Programme
Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation Community
Asheesh Kumar Pandey
Inclusive Growth and Employment
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Domain of origin Australia 2014 Civil Society Conversations
User Tags #employment #youth, youth employment and entrepreneurship, debt swap
Topics Inclusive Growth and Employment