Global Partnership monitoring provides evidence on progress in implementing effective development co-operation commitments at the country, regional and global level, supporting accountability among all development partners.

Tracking progress and capturing behaviour change

The Global Partnership’s monitoring framework tracks country-level progress in implementing the four internationally-agreed effective development co-operation principles: country ownership, a focus on results, inclusive partnerships and transparency and mutual accountability to one another. While other international accountability frameworks monitor the results and outcomes of development co-operation, the Global Partnership monitoring framework seeks to capture behaviour change by focusing on how stakeholders partner at the country* level.

Monitoring led by developing countries themselves

Reporting to the framework is voluntary and country-led, based on developing countries own data and information systems. Biennial reporting involves the full range of development stakeholders, including civil society, the private sector and others. Results contribute to strengthening mutual accountability, learning and dialogue among partners for implementing their development effectiveness commitments.

The monitoring framework consists of a set of ten indicators which focus on strengthening developing countries’ institutions, increasing the transparency and predictability of development co-operation, enhancing gender equality, and supporting greater involvement of civil society, parliaments and the private sector in development efforts.

Providing evidence on effective development co-operation

Global results from each monitoring round are published in a joint UNDP-OECD progress report. Progress reports from the 2013-2014 and 2015-2016 rounds are now available, offering a snapshot of progress on implementing the internationally-agreed development effectiveness principles. Individual country profiles, which contextualise results at the country level, were also made available for the 2015-2016 round.

Additional information on the Global Partnership monitoring process, including the role of all stakeholders as well as on the refinement of the framework , can be found in the technical documents section.

2016 Progress Report

2016 Summary Report

2014 Progress Report

Frequently Asked Questions

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Who participates in Global Partnership monitoring?

The Global Partnership monitoring process is led by developing countries themselves, in consultation with development partners including providers of development co-operation, representatives from civil society, parliamentarians and the private sector, among others. Provision of data and information for the 2015-2016 monitoring exercise was led by 81 countries, with the participation of more than 125 bilateral and multilateral development partners, as well as hundreds of civil society organisations, private sector representatives and other relevant development stakeholders in participating countries.

What does the Global Partnership monitor?

The Global Partnership monitoring framework’s ten indicators measure progress in areas related to the four internationally-agreed effective development co-operation principles: country ownership, a focus on results, inclusive partnerships and transparency and mutual accountability to one another. Areas of focus include strengthening developing countries’ institutions, increasing the transparency and predictability of development co-operation, enhancing gender equality and supporting greater involvement of civil society, parliaments and the private sector in development efforts.

Some of the indicators are based on those captured in the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness (2005), while others were introduced in 2012 to capture the broader dimensions of the Busan Partnership Agreement, as called for by developing countries. A global target is available for each indicator, however, stakeholders can agree to different targets at the country level based on their own country context and experience.

A detailed description of each indicator is provided in Annex II of the Monitoring Guide, which includes fact sheets setting out the means of measurement, method of calculation and data source. Page 5 of the Monitoring Guide describes the sources and types of data being collected for each indicator.

Why do we monitor?

As highlighted in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, improving the quality, impact and effectiveness of all types of development co-operation is crucial to ensuring that the Sustainable Development Goals are achieved. The Global Partnership’s monitoring exercise aims to provide evidence on progress and opportunities in the implementation all stakeholders’ effective development co-operation commitments. Results from Global Partnership monitoring support mutual accountability among all partners and inform multi-stakeholder dialogue on making development co-operation more effective at the country, regional and global level.

How does the Global Partnership monitoring exercise work?

The monitoring exercise is led by developing countries and grounded in their own information and evaluation systems. Data is collected under the leadership of partner country governments, and validated in consultation with development partners including providers of development co-operation, representatives from civil society, parliamentarians and the private sector. The data is then submitted to the UNDP-OECD Joint Support Team for aggregation and analysis into a Global Progress Report and individual Country Profiles. More information on the process for the 2015-2016 Monitoring Round can be found in the Monitoring Guide.

What are the key findings from 2014 and 2016?

2014

2016

What are the Global Progress Reports and Country Profiles?

Global Progress Reports are the culmination of the biennial monitoring process. They offer a snapshot of international progress on making development co-operation more effective. These reports present findings from the monitoring exercise, based on careful analysis and aggregation of country-level data, validated by developing countries and their partners. The Progress Reports are intended to stimulate and inform policy dialogue at the country, regional and international levels, generating an evidence-base for further collective action to strengthen the contribution of effective development co-operation to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

Individual Country Profiles were introduced in the 2015-2016 Monitoring Round to summarise country-level progress, opportunities and challenges in implementing the effective development co-operation principles, taking into account individual country context and typology. Participating countries and territories are using the Monitoring Profiles in national reviews of development progress; establishment of national co-operation policies and institutional reforms; and development of transparency and mutual accountability mechanisms. Moreover, the Profiles highlight how national governments have incorporated development priorities and SDG targets into national planning and policy implementation.

2016 Progress Report

2016 Summary Report

2014 Progress Report

How is Global Partnership monitoring data used?

Rather than ranking countries or organisations, Global Partnership monitoring aims to generate evidence-based dialogue on development co-operation, its policies and its effectiveness to facilitate mutual accountability and learning among development partners at all the national, regional and global levels. Global Progress Reports from each round of monitoring also provide a key source of evidence on progress for the Global Partnership’s Ministerial-level meetings.

Data generated from Global Partnership monitoring now provides evidence to national SDG reviews and global SDG targets on respecting countries’ policy space and leadership (SDG 17.15); multi-stakeholder partnerships for development (SDG 17.16); and gender equality and women’s empowerment (SDG 5c). Lessons learned from the Global Partnership monitoring exercise serve as major inputs on the effectiveness of development financing to the ECOSOC Financing for Development Forum the annual United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), which is the central body for SDG follow-up and review.

Where can I download the monitoring data?

What is the Monitoring Advisory Group?

The Global Partnership’s Monitoring Advisory Group was established in 2015 to provide technical expertise and advice to strengthen the monitoring framework and ensure its relevance in the rapidly evolving post-2015 landscape. The group is composed of 12 high-level experts from developing country governments, development co-operation providers, think tanks and civil society organisations.

View a complete list of documents related to the Monitoring Advisory Group’s work in the Technical Documents section.

When will the next Monitoring Round be launched?

The 2018 Global Partnership monitoring round is expected to launch in summer 2018. For more information, contact the OECD-UNDP Joint Support Team at monitoring@effectivecooperation.org.

How can I learn more about participating in Global Partnership Monitoring?

To learn more about participating in Global Partnership Monitoring, review the Monitoring Guide or contact the UNDP-OECD Joint Support Team at monitoring@effectivecooperation.org.

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